News & from the journals

Thousands of scientists publish a paper every five days

The number of authors who publish a paper every 5 days grew about 20-fold between 2001 and 2014.

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Gene editing restores dystrophin expression in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Eric Olson's team used AAV gene therapy vectors to deliver CRISPR gene editing components in a larger animal model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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Robotic- assisted exercise coaching in a diverse sample of smokers and nonsmokers

Exercise coaching intervention was effective for smoking cessation among depressed women smokers. The authors developed exercise coaching using a robotic human exercise trainer.

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10 Benefits of Exercise on the Brain and Body

Physical fitness through exercise is one of the most common pieces of advice offered by medics across the planet. Discover ten benefits of exercise on your brain and body.

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Identifying and targeting residual leukemic cells responsible of leukemia relapse

in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), despite high remission rates, the patient’s disease often recurs or relapses. The authors discovered a new transcient leukemic stem cell type invovled in leukemia relapsing

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How do CAR T-Cells work?

Anticancer CAR T-cell therapy seeks to sharpen and strengthen the immune system’s inherent cancer-fighting powers.

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#CancerTomorrow: New advancements in Cancer Therapy

Follow #CancerTomorrow on Twitter to #discover the innovations discussed during our last meeting in #Immunotherapy. Open and available to everyone. We will tweet out from March 26th the entire content of the conference with leading scientists.

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Book of the moment: Exercise and Physical Activity: Your daily guide

This guide written in collaboration with the US National Institute of Ageing provides tips and exercises to help you stay healthy regardless of your budget and your age.

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News of the Week : Ipsen Foundation sponsoring the UNESCO Science Report 2020

The Fondation Ipsen, which operates under the aegis of the Fondation de France, is contributing financial support to the UNESCO Science report, which is due for release on 10 November 2020.

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News of the Week: Discover Science with plays

Discover our new partnership with the "Ateliers du Spectacle" to launch scientific plays with a scientist who presents, plays and discusses his science with the public.

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Article of the week: Acceptability of Robotic-Assisted Exercise Coaching in Diverse Youth

News of the week : potential acceptability of robotic-assisted exercise coaching among diverse youth.

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Story of the week: the white blood cells and the antibodies

What do you know about the immune cells ? Antibodies ? Discover this article to better understand these cells regularly checked during blood tests

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News of the week: 25 international top journalists selected to participate to the Paris Accords of Science Communication

25 leading international journalists have been selected to participate to this meeting gathering top experts and scientists. The objective: better communicate on Science and first piority topics for society

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Story of the week: History of allergies

Historical anecdotes and breakthroughs of the last two centuries about allergies

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New partnership : Fondation Ipsen Mobility Prizes with Science Po

Science Po Paris and Fondation Ipsen created these Mobility prizes to provide financial aid to disabled students to study abroad in prestigious universities.

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Webinar of the Month: Engaging citizen scientists: Will the walls of the ivory towers come tumbling down?

For more than 200 years, however, Science has been conducted only by scientists, but now, citizen scientists have been engaged to measure bird migration, the proliferation of plastics pollution, and disease outbreaks. This webinar will discuss how citizens can contribute to Science, the pros and cons.

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Story of the week: Allergies

Today, almost one in three people suffer from allergies. Scientists estimate that in 2050, one in two people will be concerned. How do allergies work? Why is this disease expanding? What are the reasons?

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#Story of the Week: History of memory !

The History of Memory is rocked by attempts at explanations, theories, doubts, and of course, recent advances. We will therefore start from the first reflections of Aristotle and other thinkers of the Antiquity, passing through certain beliefs of the Middle Ages and modern-day thinkers, before ending, as always, by the progresses of the last two hundred years

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#Webinar of the month (2/2) : Money matters: Science entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship is a major source of scientific advancement as well as a mechanism for gaining personal wealth. How should we best handle entrepreneurship in science? Join the discussion.

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Webinar of the month: From grassroots to 30,000 feet: A discussion on the fate of graduate educatio

This webinar draws together educational visionaries to conjecture the future of higher education and its impact on science learning and literacy.

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Webinar of the month: Science of incarceration

In this webinar, the expert panel will tackle incarceration and examine how society’s need for redress can be balanced with our moral obligation to treat all human beings with respect and dignity.

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#Poem of the month: Science in poetry

Mr Dudley’s perspective on science is unique, and it is a privilege for Fondation Ipsen to communicate his poems for free for the first time.

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#Story of the Week: What is memory?

Memory is the function that allows us to record, store and retrieve information to interact with our environment, perform everyday tasks, and so on. But how does it work? How can we differentiate everyday life memory loss from cerebral dementia?

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#Story of the week: History of stress

In this article, we come back on the History of stress, which was only discovered biologically in the first half of the 20th century.

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#Webinar of the month: Fiscal fitness for scientists: The price you pay for ignorance

The financial pressures of being a scientist are not limited to youngsters—with tenure becoming more difficult and likely to disappear, many more senior scientists have little or no financial security either. Is poverty the right price to pay for a career in science?

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#Story of the week: History of genes

Today, genetics refers to the study of the transmission of hereditary traits and gene function. Discover this amazing (Hi)story !

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Parternship of the Month : A lab with Humanity & Inclusion

Atlas Logistique (AL) will set up a logistics vulnerability laboratory to monitor key access and transportation indicators, analyze logistic environments in Cherokee data resources about the world’s most challenging contexts.

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Our new “Curious Minds” books

Discover our new "Curious Minds" books

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Coronavirus, recommendations and recent scientific advances

Find out in this article, the basic recommendations to prevent new Coronavirus infection. We also come back on the recent advances obtained in France at the Institut Pasteur.

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What you can do to protect yourself and others from Coronavirus

Fondation Ipsen strongly recommends to follow the basic protective measures against the new Coronavirus from the WHO.

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Together, let’s leave a trace !

The "Let's leave a trace" campaign aims to collect texts, photos or drawings from individuals during this confinement period. Fondation Ipsen will produce a free book to keep track of this period of struggle against this invisible enemy.

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